All Day Weaning Tips: December

Do you have a question about your baby or toddler’s nutrition? Struggling with complementary feeding? Looking for some tips to help your fussy eater?

Every month we hold an all day Q&A session on Instagram where our in-house dietitian, Paula, answers all your questions! If you missed December's Q&A, here are some of the most commonly asked questions and answers - we hope you find it helpful.

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I want to give my 8 month old avocado on toast for breakfast, but all shop bought bread seems to have salt in it... I freshly make all her food (organic) but bread seems a bit of a stretch! Can they have ANY salt at all? (@theplantbasedbella)

Avocado and toast is a great idea for breakfast for a baby (and adult!). Babies up to 12 months can have up to 1g salt per day (0.4g sodium) as it occurs in some foods such as bread, cheese etc. So it’s fine to give your 8 month old some shop bought bread. They do need a tiny amount of sodium to grow but this is present in formula / breast milk and foods as above!

It may sound like a silly question, but when and how is the best way to introduce chicken and meats into my baby's diet? He is 6 months old and I'm only giving him vegetables at the moment. What is the right portion to give initially and how and when do you increase it? (@xxhoneychildxx)

It’s not silly at all! Meats can be tricky to introduce to babies as they are a difficult texture. Cook meats until they are soft, and then purée. Add approx 1 teaspoon puréed meat to 3 teaspoons veggies. You can also give some strips of very soft meat to him as finger foods from about 7 months. Increase as per his appetite. It’s a good idea to introduce meats and other iron rich foods from around 6-7 months as this is when iron stores run out. Some other examples include beans/lentils, oily fish, eggs, hummus, fortified cereals, nut butters.

Can I started giving my son non-pureed solids, even though he’s only got one teeny tiny tooth? He’s 7mos old and so far, I’ve only been giving him pureed food and these baby corn puffs that melt pretty quickly in the mouth. If I can start with the solids, what food types can I start introducing and how much should I introduce per meal? (@nikkirooniecan)

Yes, you can start giving your son soft finger foods, even with no teeth, as they use their gums. The puffs also help them transition from puréed foods to finger foods. Soft foods such as cooked veggies (broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, sweet potatoes, etc.) and soft fruits such as mangos, bananas, peaches, plums, avocado etc.) are all examples of some foods you could try. Make sure you are always watching your baby when they are eating. 

I’m doing a mix of baby led and mashed foods - my 8 month old likes to feed herself and loves sticks of pear and banana she can feed herself. Only savoury food she seems to like or love is porridge, and also puréed spinach, so I made a risotto yesterday with homemade chicken stock and puréed spinach which she loved. At moment I’m spoon feeding these meals which she does tolerate, but by the end she wants to do it but then not much food ends up in her mouth and she chews on the spoon. Any advice? Should I be serving sticks of veg at the same time to satisfy her self feeding? She just doesn’t seem that interested in plain sticks of veg! (@sharonlane82)

It’s absolutely fine to do a mixture of baby-led weaning and spoon feeding. I would give her her own spoon when she’s having porridge, or offer soft finger foods alongside mashed foods. For example: offer cooked soft broccoli florets with mashed veggies and lentils. Don’t worry about not much of the food going in her mouth at this stage, she will get the hang of it! Breast milk or formula milk are still providing important nutrients. Keep offering veggies and other savoury foods... research says that repeated exposure is key to children liking veggies later on!

For more weaning advice, and any specific questions, join us for our next Q&A. Keep an eye on our Facebook and Instagram pages for more information.

Rhian WilliamsComment